Posca Pens on Ceramic Mug

I loved it, the kids would love it too!

Keeping the kids occupied can be tough. Arts and crafts offer not only short term activities for them to fill the time but, if they take an interest (irrespective of their initial skill level), arts and/or crafts can prove to be a lifelong hobby.  As an activity for the kids (or even those not so young), Jane recommends using Posca Pens to decorate a mug, or plate as a great activity. This is her short account of the process when she tried decorating a mug for the first time.

Choose your mug (or plate)

It doesn’t have to be new – anything will do providing you clean it properly before you start. In fact, as a starting point for the kids, it might be a good idea to pull out the old chipped mug or plate from the back of the cupboard. The first one isn’t likely to be the best – so leave room for improvement.

 

Pick your design & your pens

I recommend having a picture of the design you want to create (either printed or on a screen you can see while you work) so you can copy it. The internet is a great source of images. Pick something fairly simple for the first one you try, as drawing on a smooth, curved surface is very different from drawing on a flat piece of paper. In hindsight I think I might be better to have gone for something a little simpler for my first design!

Your design will dictate the number of pens you need. Again a simpe design will be possible with just two or three pens: possibly 1 with a bigger nib (e.g. a PC-5M or PC-8K) for the background / larger areas and a couple of different coloured finer ones (e.g. PC-1M or PC-3M).

I chose a Sugar Candy Skull as my first design and used just 3 pens.

 

Get the outline right

Getting the outline onto the mug proved to be quite a challenge – we all love a challenge! Drawing on a curved surface was harder than I am used to (or at least quite different) and getting the picture to look right took me a few goes. One big benefit of the Posca Pens on this medium is that you can wash it off and start again if you are not happy.

If you are helping and encouraging the kids to give it a go (or even doing it yourself) don’t let the aim be for perfection – they (or you) may never get there. Encourage them to do their best but get them to accept that there will always be room for improvement. It may be the start of a new hobby after all, rather than a one-off activity to kill a bit of time.

Add to, complete the design

Once you have the outline as you want it to be you can add the details from the image you are copying. Take your time and don’t try to over-embelish the piece.

 

To make it permanent, or not?

Finally, when you have finished you have a a couple of choices.

If your child is happy with the design you can make it permanent by baking the piece in your oven at 160C for no more than 45 minutes.

Alternatively, they can wash it off and start again. If they decide not to keep it I suggest you get them to take a few pictures so that they can see the improvement they have made when they try again.

Please note that this is not a service that Gadsbys offer to clients – just an example of the private work done by one of the highly skilled and knowledgable Gadsby’s team shown for your interest.

 

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