Texture paste – adding body to your artwork

by Apr 27, 2021Art Supplies

Adding a heavy body feel to your work

This week Jane uses Texture paste on a few pieces of her art.

Texture paste is a great medium when you want to add a heavy body feel to your art work. I have used texture paste myself on a project for a friend and it did just what I wanted it to do.

To apply to the surface use a palette knife, use with stencils for defined shapes, or create textures and patterns using texture tools or any found item that will give you a great texture.

Once you have applied the paste to the canvas or paper (depending on what you are using) then apply paint over it with a brush or by splattering paint on to the surface over the texture paste. By running the brush over the surface lightly, the paint hits only the top ridges of the textured surface.

daler rowney texture paste

Painting of poppies

These next pictures show you how effective texture paste can be. This first example is a painting of poppies using the texture paste.

If you look closely you can make out the texture.

Partly finished painting

This is an excellent example of using texture paste as this has been partly finished.

Here you can clearly see the texture paste that has been added directly to the surface of the paper and then paint has been added.

poppy painting to use as start point

Using texture paste for scary effect

As I mentioned at the beginning I used texture paste to add a new dimension to a painting I worked on for a friend. I wanted the hand to look like it was coming out of the board and I found that texture paste was just right for the job.

As this area of texture paste is very thick it did take a few days to dry out. Once dry I could then paint over the hand with tones of grey and white then to finish I added glow in the dark paint.

Trying something new

It’s been great trying something new. I recommend it, for good effects and texture to add a little difference to your painting.

Jane is a member of the Gadsby’s team. She has a wide knowledge of the arts & crafts products and materials sold by Gadsby’s both from the perspective of an advisor in the shop and, for many of the products, from personal use too.

Please note that this is not a service that Gadsbys offer to clients – just an example of the private work done by one of the highly skilled and knowledgable Gadsby’s team shown for your interest.

The prices quoted were correct at the time of publication of this post. 

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